Trade Agreement Turkey

Turkey is a member of the Euro-Mediterranean Partnership (Euromed) and should therefore conclude free trade agreements with all other Mediterranean partners in order to create a Euro-Mediterranean free trade area. Turkey negotiates and concludes free trade agreements with third countries in parallel with the global trend towards free trade agreements and its commitment to the customs union. Under the EU common tariff, preferential trade regimes are the most important part of trade policy towards third countries. Turkey, a party to the 1947 General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO) since 1995, implements free trade agreements in accordance with Article XXIV of the 1947 GATT. Under this article, Turkey could give its trading partners more favourable treatment within the framework of a customs union or free trade area, without extending this treatment to all WTO members, subject to certain conditions. The agreement contains detailed provisions on trade facilitation (Annex VI), including certain elements of the WTO. Without prejudice to WTO provisions, the Turkey-EU customs union provides an important legal basis for Turkey`s free trade agreements. Within the framework of the customs union, Turkey is directing its trade policy towards the EU`s common trade policy. This harmonization concerns both autonomous regimes and preferential agreements with third countries. It describes the bilateral and multilateral trade agreements to which that country belongs, including with the United States. Includes websites and other resources that allow U.S. companies to get more information about how they can use these agreements. The provisions relating to the protection of intellectual property rights (Article 15 and a new Annex XII) concern, among other things, patents, trademarks, copyrights and geographical indications.

The agreement contains provisions for trade remedies (Articles 2.17 to 2.19), i.e. subsidies and countervailing measures, anti-dumping and global safeguard measures on the basis of relevant WTO agreements. In Chapter 6, the parties recognize that anti-competitive trade practices have the potential to undermine the effects of liberalization. They stress the importance of cooperation and consultation on the application of competition law. In addition, the chapter provides the contracting parties with the opportunity to take appropriate action where anti-competitive practice continues to affect trade despite previous cooperation and consultation.